RACE DATE: JULY 22, 2018
Days Hours Minutes Seconds
2017 Schedule Highlights
Friday, July 21, 2017
2:00 pm Expo Opens; and Race Packet Pickup Begins
2:00 pm Race Briefing I
4:00 pm Race Briefing II
6:00 pm Race Briefing III
7:00 pm Expo Closes
Saturday, July 22, 2017
9:00 am Expo Opens; and Race Packet Pickup Begins
9:00 am Race Briefing I
10:00 am TTF Gold Member Event
11:00 am Race Briefing II
12:00 pm Mandatory and Only Race Briefing for the Triathlon Ontario Cup Series Races
12:00 pm Swim Course
Familiarization Starts
2:30 pm Race Briefing III
4:00 pm Race Briefing IV
4:30 pm Expo Closes
Sunday, July 23, 2017
5:30 am Transition Opens for Olympic Distance Race
6:50 am RACE - Olympic Distance Race Starts
8:00 am Transition Opens for Sprint Distance Races
9:20 am RACE - Triathlon Ontario Cup Series Races‎ Start
9:25 am RACE - Age Group Draft Legal Sprint Race Starts
9:30 am RACE - Sprint Distance Race Starts
View full schedule

Key Training Points

The Transition (by Jasper Blake): The transition is often considered the 4th event of a triathlon. The transition refers to the time spent between swimming and biking (T1) and between biking and running (T2).
 

Quite simply it is when you have to “transition” from one sport to the next. Transitions are usually timed and will show up on the final results sheet so it’s important to practice them and get as good as you can in order to have extra bragging rights!

Having a great transition can set the tone for the event you are transitioning to and can improve your overall time.  Here are some tips on how to nail your transition.

Know the flow: It’s incredibly important to know how the transition “flows”. Part of your warm up should include a walk through the transition area so you have a mental picture of where you are supposed to go.

During your walk through, start as if you were exiting the swim and follow the path you will have to take during the race. Walk into transition and practice finding your bike. Spotting your bike among the masses can be challenging but if you have walked the path a few times before you will nail it.  Counting bike racks or using other identification markers like a sponsors banner near your bike can really help.

The next step is to pretend you are exiting with your bike.  Again, follow the exact path you will have to take and note where the mount line is (the line where you are safely and legally allowed to get on your bike).

Next, you will need to walk as if you are coming back in from the bike.  Notice where the dismount line is (the line where you are required to be off your bike or you will face a penalty and possible disqualification). Walk back into transition and back to where you will have to rack your bike. The second transition can be tougher to negotiate because your bike is not there as a strong visible marker. Picking some identification markers will really help you during the second transition. The last step in your walk through is to follow the path you will have to take in order to exit the run.

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Tips from former Ironman Canada Champion, Jasper Blake, from 7SYSTEMS Sports Supplement.

To learn more about 7SYSTEMS, please visit: www.7systems.ca.

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